The Most Commonly Performed Cosmetic Surgery Is Liposuction

If you are considering liposuction, you are far from alone. Statistics show that in the mid-90s as many as 300,000 people had liposuction each year.

Introduced in 1979, liposuction has changed significantly over the years. Liposuction performed in this way resulted in patients generally not being able to walk upright for up to six weeks, suffering great pain and scarring.

Today, liposuction can possibly be done as an outpatient procedure concurrent of many surgical center facilities. It is relatively painless with bleeding, infections and other complications very rare. The normal events that will occur when liposuction is planned are the following:

Consultation with the doctor. At this visit, the doctor will evaluate the patient and fall back on areas where he will be performing the liposuction. These drawings will occur around the entire body, as the doctor will normally be examining improving the look of the body from all angles.

Day of surgery:

A cannula, or thin tube, is then inserted into the fatty areas. Suction removes the fat through this tube and puts it into a disposable container.

After the fat is removed, you are wrapped in a dressing that continues in your body for approximately five days. Foam pads are put on the areas where the cannula entered the patient and the skin is then placed in a garment just like a girdle. This girdle-like garment holds the patient’s skin tightly and holds the foam pads firmly instead.

Demerol or another painkiller is injected.

Lying down, the fatty areas of the body are packed with a solution of sterile salt adrenaline, anesthetic, and water.

When the anesthetic tells, small holes are made in the skin with small needles where fat is to remain removed.

Upon arrival, the patient may be given something like Valium to guide them relax (if nervous).

Recovery:

Liposuction performed in this way resulted in patients usually not being able to walk upright for up to six weeks, suffering great pain and scarring.

The remainder of the recovery period is just the body gradually healing. Drainage from the treated sites normally comes by the seventh day after surgery, the slight bruising that can occur will heal in about two weeks, and puffiness and swelling can take several months to completely disappear. The garment offered to the patient after surgery must be worn for up to 4 weeks.

The only thing those who are pondering liposuction must realize is that this procedure doesn’t permanently eliminate fat. The fat will come back quickly if you have liposuction and return to your old habits (lack of exercise and overeating). Liposuction otherwise to a new lifestyle of moderate exercise and healthy eating can lead to a much thinner, shapelier body in the end.

The day after surgery– Most patients present, but there is a little discomfort. The girdle-garment begins to feel constricting on the day after surgery.

Today, liposuction can be done as an outpatient procedure at one of many surgical center facilities. At this visit, the surgeon will look into the patient and draw on areas where he will be performing the liposuction. The only thing those who are thinking about liposuction must actualize is that this procedure doesn’t permanently eliminate fat. If you have liposuction and return to your old habits (lack of exercise and overeating), the fat will come back instantly.

The second day after surgery– Many patients have called this the “worst” day of the entire experience. The overall feeling of aching and bound up is some of the most unpleasant on this particular day.

After that, the liposuction experience just keeps getting better and better. Small amounts of activity can be done from the day after surgery and many patients are back to work by the third day after the procedure.

After the recovery period has ended, the patient’s opinion of the liposuction is often positive. Dropping a size or more can make anyone feel better about themselves.

Day of surgery– After the procedure is completed, the patient can normally return house in about an hour. When home, many take the other day “off” and rest or sleep.

Kenneth R. Francis, MD
114 E 71st St #1w, New York, NY 10021
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